Thoughts on Agile Acceptance

Cara Penyak, an Agile Project Leader on my team, volunteered at the Global Scrum Gathering in Orlando last week and brought me back a new friend, Lee Allison.  Lucky me!  I don’t even need to attend a conference to make new friends.  Anyhow, Lee asked me to review his latest blog post “Agile Acceptance” and I thought what better topic to re-blog than this.
A framework is defined as “a basic structure underlying a system, concept, or text.”  Seems pretty straightforward but, among the agile community, frameworks are super polarizing for whatever reason.  If frameworks represent a “basic structure” then they are surely intended to be adapted.   Who cares which scaling framework you start or end with?  
It’s the Agile Manifesto we should all be upholding.  It’s adapting to change over following a plan which makes us agile, not which framework we choose or even which certifications for frameworks we hold. Let’s not forget our roots!  What’s most important are those 4 values and 12 principles of the Agile Manifesto.  In fact, the Agile Manifesto is framework agnostic.  Basically, Scrum, SAFe, LESS, or whatever isn’t the only way to be Agile.  There is no one right way! 
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About Stephanie Davis

Stephanie is Executive Director - Enterprise Agility Office at Catalina, driving lift and loyalty for the world's leading CPG brands and retailers.  Most recently, Stephanie was Senior Director of Enterprise Agility at Valpak. She was with Valpak for 13 years, most of which were focused on leading their agile transformation to what became a world renowned success story published in case studies and demonstrated to over 50 different companies through the years via agile tours.  Prior to Valpak, Stephanie held past positions in the project management domain with AT&T and IBM. Stephanie's academic credentials include a BS in Marketing from the University of South Florida and an MBA in International Business from the University of Bristol in England. She also maintains the Project Management Professional (PMP), Agile Certified Practitioner (ACP), and Certified Scrum Master (CSM) credentials. Stephanie is big on tech community involvement!  Most recently, she served as an elected board member to the Agile Alliance, a non-profit organization with global membership, committed to advancing agile development values, principles, and practices. In addition, she serves her local community as an organizer for Tampa Bay Agile, the largest and most active tech Meetup in the area, and the annual Agile Open Florida event. In 2016, Stephanie was awarded Tampa Bay Tech’s Technology Leader of the Year and the Tampa Bay Business Journal’s BusinessWoman of the Year (Tech) and Emerging Technology Leader of the Year. View all posts by Stephanie Davis

2 responses to “Thoughts on Agile Acceptance

  • Johnny Ordóñez

    Great post! Agree! Congrats Stephanie 🙂

  • Johnny Ordóñez

    Reblogged this on Johnny Ordóñez and commented:
    “It’s the Agile Manifesto we should all be upholding. It’s adapting to change over following a plan which makes us agile, not which framework we choose or even which certifications for frameworks we hold. Let’s not forget our roots! What’s most important are those 4 values and 12 principles of the Agile Manifesto. In fact, the Agile Manifesto is framework agnostic. Basically, Scrum, SAFe, LESS, or whatever isn’t the only way to be Agile. There is no one right way!”

    Great post and agree!

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